Strategic Alliance and Practice Research

Strategic Alliance

CCF places great importance on creating an environment that is able to support the medical treatment of children with cancer. In order to do so, we continue to collaborate with our strategic partners by providing funding for various programmes. CCF’s contributions over the years…

2019

    • CCF established the CCF Cellular Therapy Programme as an expansion of the Tan Cheng Lim – CCF Professorship in Paediatric Oncology in the effort to establish the Paediatric Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy Centre (BMTCTC).

2018

    • CCF forged collaborations with National University of Singapore to support the CAR-T Cell Immunotherapy Programme to fund clinical trials for the treatment of relapsed or high-risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia in children. The programme also aims to improve the survival rates for the children.
    • In collaboration with the Singapore Hospice Council (SHC). CCF was appointed Professional Partner at SHC’s inaugural Grief and Bereavement Conference.

2017

    • CCF has pledged $200,000 towards Cellular Immunology Research with NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine with the goal of identifying transformative and new cost-effective treatments for childhood cancer.
    • CCF has collaborated with Assisi Hospice to provide a continuum of care in its new paediatrics ward for families with children suffering from cancer. CCF also provides toys and media resources for the playroom located inside the paediatrics ward.
    • In 2017, CCF contributed a total of $2,702,056 in support of research and education in paediatric oncology and other collaborations with medical partners and organisations such as Singapore Cord Blood Bank.

2016

    • In a key collaboration with National University Hospital and VIVA Foundation, CCF pledged $4 million to set up the VIVA-NUS Centre for Translational Research in Acute Leukaemia (VIVA-NUS CenTRAL) for leukaemia diagnosis and translational research.
    • CCF contributed $1.2 million to the psychosocial component of the VIVA-KKH Paediatric Brain and Solid Tumour Programme.
    • In collaboration with KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, CCF contributed $1.738 million to fund CCF Psychosocial and Supportive Care Programme for Paediatric Oncology to develop a holistic paediatric oncology and supportive care programme.
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2015

    • CCF contributed a total of $2.3 million in support of research and education in paediatric oncology and other collaborations with medical partners and organisations such as KKH, NUH and Singapore Cord Blood Bank.

2014

    • CCF pledged $2.5million in a strategic partnership with The SingHealth Duke-NUS Paediatrics Academic Clinical Programme to set up the Tan Cheng Lim-CCF Professorship in Paediatric Oncology. With dollar-to-dollar matching from the Singapore government, the fund was doubled to $5million.
    • CCF continued to fund a research assistant at National University of Singapore
    • CCF continued to fund a Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) coordinator at National University Hospital
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2013

    • CCF contributed 12 sets of 3D Smart LED TV and 12 Arm Brackets for TV installation to KK Women’s & Children’s Hospital
    • CCF continued to support the development of Singapore Cord Blood Bank with a funding of $250,000 for units of cord blood successfully banked
    • CCF continued to fund a research assistant at National University of Singapore
    • CCF continued to fund a Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) coordinator at National University Hospital

2012

    • CCF provided a $5000 funding to Singapore Hospice Council for the Singapore Pallative Care Conference 2012
    • CCF funded KKH’s Clinical Research Coordinator Management Course
    • CCF continued to fund a Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) coordinator at National University Hospital
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2011

    • CCF funded a Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) coordinator at National University Hospital
    • CCF funded a total of $40,000 for 80 local delegates who attended St Jude-VIVA Forum
    • CCF contributed three laptops and overhead laptop tables to KK Women’s & Children’s Hospital
    • CCF continued to fund a Research Assistant at National University of Singapore
    • CCF continued to support the development of Singapore Cord Blood Bank with a funding of $250,0000 for units of cord blood successfully banked

2010

    • CCF supported a Medico-Psychosocial study on Paediatric Sibling Donors of Blood and Marrow Transplant with a pledge of $1,318 in funding
    • CCF continued to support the development of Singapore Cord Blood Bank with a funding of $250,0000 for units of cord blood successfully banked

2009

    • CCF continued to fund a Research Assistant each at KK Women’s & Children’s Hospital and National University Hospital
    • CCF also provided funding of $30,000 to the 3rd St Jude-VIVA Forum

2008

    • CCF introduced video-conferencing in the wards allowing our beneficiaries to keep in touch with friends and family during their prolonged hospital stay
    • NCSS has chosen CCF to be the anchor tenant of the newly opened Social Service Hub at Central Plaza

2007

    • CCF pledged a further funding of $150,000 per year for 2007 and 2008, to support Singapore Cord Blood Bank’s second phase of development. In addition to building the inventory of cord blood, the funds enabled SCCB to carry out training, development and education activities in support of their operations.
    • CCF funded two physicians from Indonesia to train in KK Women’s & Children’s Hospital
    • CCF funded The Children’s Hospice International 18th World Congress held in Singapore. Participants included paediatric, palliative and hospice care providers from around the world
    • CCF helped to fund the first St. Jude-VIVA Forum with a focus on training of medical professionals in Singapore and the ASEAN region

2006

    • CCF pledged $1.2million to KK Women’s & Children’s Hospital for renovation and building of new bone-marrow transplant room (BMT) at KKH-CCF Children’s Cancer Centre
    • CCF collaborated with the Department of Social Work and Psychology, National University of Singapore, to study parents’ adjustment to chronic illnesses of their children
    • CCF continued to provide direct support to KK Women’s & Children’s Hospital and National University Hospital for the development and maintenance of childhood cancer registries/databases as well as research studies

2005

    • CCF collaborated with the Department of Social Work and Department of Psychology in National University of Singapore to conduct research and studies on siblings and caregiver coping with childhood cancer
    • First sum of $1million disbursed to National Cancer Centre to establish a CCF Research Programme

2004

    • Launch of the Singapore Cord Blood Bank and Regional Outreach programme, both funded by CCF
    • CCF made an in-principle agreement to support the efforts of the National Cancer Centre by funding one of its Research Laboratories to establish new research collaborations into childhood cancers using state of the art technology

2003

    • CCF pledged $500,000 to set up Singapore Cord Blood Bank
    • CCF was co-sponsor for the ASEAN Childhood Cancer Workshop

2001

    • Two psychosocial research and several evaluation studies were completed

2000

    • CCF organised a psychosocial workshop on childhood cancer in the inaugural SIOP Asia Conference in April 2000
    • With funding support from CCF, the Paediatric Inpatient Cancer Centre at NUH was established

1997

  • CCF supported training and research both in the psycho-social and medical fields by:

    • Collaborating in a research initiative with the Department of Social Work, Arts Faculty, National University of Singapore
    • Providing funding for training of local nursing staff in advance paediatric care
    • Sending two social workers on overseas training and attachments
 

Practice Research

CCF’s research team conducts research and programme evaluation that guide service development and contribute to CCF’s mission of improving the quality of life of beneficiaries.

Completed Research:

2019

    • Needs of children with cancer who have returned to mainstream school

      This study captured the sharing of 16 parents and four youth survivors on the challenges faced in returning to school after cancer treatments. Along the illness trajectory, parents and youths had engaged various systems including CCF, school, family and medical to support the schooling needs. This finding denotes the importance of the coordinated efforts needed to support children with cancer in their reintegration to school.

2018

    • The aftermath of losing caregiver to cancer: Assessment of psychosocial impacts from children and adolescents’ perspectives

      This study captures the voices of 13 children and adolescents, aged seven to 16, who invited us into their worlds to reveal their lived experiences in the face of their parents’ cancer and eventual death.

      Be it pre- or post-death period, all of them experienced some form of emotional impacts and practical disruptions in daily life. Yet, all of them had their own coping strategies, primarily by engaging themselves with some forms of activities and distracting themselves from the resulted distress

    • An exploratory study of bereavement care in Singapore: the needs, coping experiences and service provision

      A collaboration with Singapore Hospice Council, this study aims to understand and examine the needs of bereaved persons and examine how far the current support network has supported the bereaved in their grief.

2017

    • Siblings’ Coping with A Brother or Sister with Childhood Cancer: The Parents’ Perspectives

      This study sought to understand the psychosocial impacts of childhood cancer on siblings. Eleven parents were interviewed through two focus group interviews. Siblings experienced tremendous changes and impacts resulting from a childhood cancer diagnosis. Parents attempted to attend to the siblings’ needs and facilitate their adjustments which helped the siblings to gradually cope and adapt over time. Such attempts often took a toll on parents juggling between the child with cancer and these siblings, and thus require additional resources to support them in this process.

    • The Needs of Children with Cancer Returning to School

      This study explored the schooling needs of children with cancer who are planning to return to school, to augment what is already known and to identify any other areas of needs or service gaps. Focus group and individual interviews were conducted with 12 parents. When their child was preparing to return school at the end of treatment, parents expressed the following concerns and needs with regards to schooling:
      1. Physical / medical constraints
      2. Psychological and emotional wellbeing
      3. Academic performance
      4. Socialisation and interpersonal relationships

      By addressing the needs and concerns identified in this study, it can help to ease the transition back to school for children with cancer.

 
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